Report: Russia Has Access to UK Visa Processing

Investigative group Bellingcat and Russian website The Insider are suggesting that Russian intelligence has infiltrated the computer infrastructure of a company that processes British visa applications.

The investigation, published Friday, aims to show how two suspected Russian military intelligence agents, who have been charged with poisoning a former Russian spy in the English city of Salisbury, may have obtained British visas.

The Insider and Bellingcat said they interviewed the former chief technical officer of a company that processes visa applications for several consulates in Moscow, including that of Britain.

The man, who fled Russia last year and applied for asylum in the United States, said he had been coerced to work with agents of the main Russian intelligence agency FSB, who revealed to him that they had access to the British visa center’s CCTV cameras and had a diagram of the center’s computer network. The two outlets say they have obtained the man’s deposition to the U.S. authorities but have decided against publishing the man’s name, for his own safety.

The Insider and Bellingcat, however, did not demonstrate a clear link between the alleged efforts of Russian intelligence to penetrate the visa processing system and Alexander Mishkin and Anatoly Chepiga, who have been charged with poisoning Sergei Skripal in Salisbury in March this year.

The man also said that FSB officers told him in spring 2016 that they were going to send two people to Britain and asked for his assistance with the visa applications. The timing points to the first reported trip to Britain of the two men, who traveled under the names of Alexander Petrov and Anatoly Boshirov. The man, however, said he told the FSB that there was no way he could influence the decision-making on visa applications.

The man said he was coerced to sign an agreement to collaborate with the FSB after one of its officers threatened to jail his mother, and was asked to create a “backdoor” to the computer network. He said he sabotaged those efforts before he fled Russia in early 2017.

In September, British intelligence released surveillance images of the agents of Russian military intelligence GRU accused of the March nerve agent attack on double agent Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury. Bellingcat and The Insider quickly exposed the agents’ real names and the media, including The Associated Press, were able to corroborate their real identities.

The visa application processing company, TLSContact, and the British Home Office were not immediately available for comment.

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Report: Russia Has Access to UK Visa Processing

Investigative group Bellingcat and Russian website The Insider are suggesting that Russian intelligence has infiltrated the computer infrastructure of a company that processes British visa applications.

The investigation, published Friday, aims to show how two suspected Russian military intelligence agents, who have been charged with poisoning a former Russian spy in the English city of Salisbury, may have obtained British visas.

The Insider and Bellingcat said they interviewed the former chief technical officer of a company that processes visa applications for several consulates in Moscow, including that of Britain.

The man, who fled Russia last year and applied for asylum in the United States, said he had been coerced to work with agents of the main Russian intelligence agency FSB, who revealed to him that they had access to the British visa center’s CCTV cameras and had a diagram of the center’s computer network. The two outlets say they have obtained the man’s deposition to the U.S. authorities but have decided against publishing the man’s name, for his own safety.

The Insider and Bellingcat, however, did not demonstrate a clear link between the alleged efforts of Russian intelligence to penetrate the visa processing system and Alexander Mishkin and Anatoly Chepiga, who have been charged with poisoning Sergei Skripal in Salisbury in March this year.

The man also said that FSB officers told him in spring 2016 that they were going to send two people to Britain and asked for his assistance with the visa applications. The timing points to the first reported trip to Britain of the two men, who traveled under the names of Alexander Petrov and Anatoly Boshirov. The man, however, said he told the FSB that there was no way he could influence the decision-making on visa applications.

The man said he was coerced to sign an agreement to collaborate with the FSB after one of its officers threatened to jail his mother, and was asked to create a “backdoor” to the computer network. He said he sabotaged those efforts before he fled Russia in early 2017.

In September, British intelligence released surveillance images of the agents of Russian military intelligence GRU accused of the March nerve agent attack on double agent Skripal and his daughter in Salisbury. Bellingcat and The Insider quickly exposed the agents’ real names and the media, including The Associated Press, were able to corroborate their real identities.

The visa application processing company, TLSContact, and the British Home Office were not immediately available for comment.

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Turkey Rejects Saudi Claim on Khashoggi’s Killing

Turkey has dismissed Saudi Arabia’s latest version of events in the October 2 killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at its consulate in Istanbul.

Saudi authorities announced this week 11 people are being charged with the writer’s killing and that the death penalty is sought for five. The country’s deputy public prosecutor alleged Khashoggi was killed in a  rogue operation that went wrong when a fight broke out as he was being injected with a drug and tied up.

“I have to say that I did not find some of the [Saudi] statements satisfactory,” said Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu Thursday.

Cavusoglu went on to repeat Ankara’s claim Khashoggi was the victim of premeditated murder.

Turkey’s political leadership has been at the forefront of challenging Saudi Arabia about the killing, forcing its leadership to repeatedly change its story.

Senior members of Turkey’s ruling AK Party joined hundreds of supporters and friends at an Istanbul mosque on Friday to pray for Khashoggi and vow that justice will be done.

“We are going to be defenders of his cause. What we want is not revenge but justice,” said Yasin Aktay, deputy AK head and friend of Khashoggi, addressing mourners.

“There are 15 people defined as perpetrators [in Khashoggi’s death], but they didn’t make this decision on their own. This is the story being sold to us, and we don’t believe in it,“ he added, criticizing Saudi Arabia’s latest version of Khashoggi’s killing.

Saudi Arabia’s changing story

In the first few days following Khashoggi’s disappearance, Saudi officials maintained that the journalist left the consulate after a visit for marriage documents.

Following sustained pressure by Ankara, through a campaign of leaks to international media of information about the killing, Saudi Arabia finally acknowledged the writer died in the consulate.

On Thursday, columnist Abdulkadir Selvi of Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper wrote that a 15-minute recording of Khashoggi’s killers undermines Riyadh’s claim the death wasn’t premeditated.

“The Saudi team discusses how to execute Khashoggi. They are reviewing their plan, which was previously prepared, and reminding themselves of the duties of each member,” wrote Selvi, who has close links to Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Turkey has already shared a seven-minute audio recording capturing Khashoggi’s killing with its Western allies and Saudi authorities. Until now, it has been widely assumed the tape was the key piece of evidence held by Turkish investigators. The claim of further recordings is likely to increase pressure on the Saudis and, in particular, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Erdogan has repeatedly alluded to the crown prince’s alleged involvement, a charge Riyadh strongly denies. Washington, a key ally of the crown prince, continues to back him publicly. And analysts suggest the US is increasingly looking to Erdogan for a resolution of the diplomatic crisis, given his country’s pivotal role in the death investigation.

“In the Khashoggi case, they have very good communication with Washington, said former senior Turkish diplomat Aydin Selcen, who served in Washington.

This past week, a U.S. media report suggested Washington was looking into the extradition of Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen in exchange for Ankara’s easing pressure on Riyadh.

Gulen lives in self-imposed exile in the state of Pennsylvania and denies Turkey’s accusation of involvement in a failed Turkish coup in 2016.

Washington denies any deal, but U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said Thursday , “We continue to evaluate the material that the Turkish government presents requesting his extradition.”

Gulen’s extradition is a top diplomatic priority for Turkey even as it dismisses any talk of a deal.

“Turkey’s pending request for Fethullah Gulen’s extradition from the United States and the investigation into Khashoggi’s murder are two separate issues. They are not connected in any way, shape or form,” said a senior Turkish official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“At no point did Turkey offer to hold back on the Khashoggi investigation in return for Fethullah Gulen’s extradition,” he added.

Analysts point out it’s doubtful Washington could make such an offer, given Gulen’s extradition is a matter for the courts, which experts say is a potentially lengthy and challenging process.

Also, analysts say since Erdogan sees the Saudi crown prince as his chief rival in the region, his goals may extend well beyond an extradition.

“We are in a new phase, and there will be more cooperation between the U.S. and Turkey. And this is part of replacing Mohammed bin Salman,” said former Turkish diplomat Selcen.

“What Erdogan wants to harvest from this case of Khashoggi’s murder,” he added, “is to replace Mohammed bin Salman as the pivotal actor, the linchpin of U.S. strategy in the Middle East.”

Some observers suggest while Turkey has so far handled the Khashoggi case with skill, it could be in danger of overreach, given the importance of the U.S.-Saudi relationship.

But they say the U.S. and Saudi Arabia likely will continue to be on the defensive, especially that Turkey, which may well have more incriminating evidence in the case, is now calling for an international investigation.

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Turkey Rejects Saudi Claim on Khashoggi’s Killing

Turkey has dismissed Saudi Arabia’s latest version of events in the October 2 killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi at its consulate in Istanbul.

Saudi authorities announced this week 11 people are being charged with the writer’s killing and that the death penalty is sought for five. The country’s deputy public prosecutor alleged Khashoggi was killed in a  rogue operation that went wrong when a fight broke out as he was being injected with a drug and tied up.

“I have to say that I did not find some of the [Saudi] statements satisfactory,” said Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu Thursday.

Cavusoglu went on to repeat Ankara’s claim Khashoggi was the victim of premeditated murder.

Turkey’s political leadership has been at the forefront of challenging Saudi Arabia about the killing, forcing its leadership to repeatedly change its story.

Senior members of Turkey’s ruling AK Party joined hundreds of supporters and friends at an Istanbul mosque on Friday to pray for Khashoggi and vow that justice will be done.

“We are going to be defenders of his cause. What we want is not revenge but justice,” said Yasin Aktay, deputy AK head and friend of Khashoggi, addressing mourners.

“There are 15 people defined as perpetrators [in Khashoggi’s death], but they didn’t make this decision on their own. This is the story being sold to us, and we don’t believe in it,“ he added, criticizing Saudi Arabia’s latest version of Khashoggi’s killing.

Saudi Arabia’s changing story

In the first few days following Khashoggi’s disappearance, Saudi officials maintained that the journalist left the consulate after a visit for marriage documents.

Following sustained pressure by Ankara, through a campaign of leaks to international media of information about the killing, Saudi Arabia finally acknowledged the writer died in the consulate.

On Thursday, columnist Abdulkadir Selvi of Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper wrote that a 15-minute recording of Khashoggi’s killers undermines Riyadh’s claim the death wasn’t premeditated.

“The Saudi team discusses how to execute Khashoggi. They are reviewing their plan, which was previously prepared, and reminding themselves of the duties of each member,” wrote Selvi, who has close links to Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Turkey has already shared a seven-minute audio recording capturing Khashoggi’s killing with its Western allies and Saudi authorities. Until now, it has been widely assumed the tape was the key piece of evidence held by Turkish investigators. The claim of further recordings is likely to increase pressure on the Saudis and, in particular, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

Erdogan has repeatedly alluded to the crown prince’s alleged involvement, a charge Riyadh strongly denies. Washington, a key ally of the crown prince, continues to back him publicly. And analysts suggest the US is increasingly looking to Erdogan for a resolution of the diplomatic crisis, given his country’s pivotal role in the death investigation.

“In the Khashoggi case, they have very good communication with Washington, said former senior Turkish diplomat Aydin Selcen, who served in Washington.

This past week, a U.S. media report suggested Washington was looking into the extradition of Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen in exchange for Ankara’s easing pressure on Riyadh.

Gulen lives in self-imposed exile in the state of Pennsylvania and denies Turkey’s accusation of involvement in a failed Turkish coup in 2016.

Washington denies any deal, but U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert said Thursday , “We continue to evaluate the material that the Turkish government presents requesting his extradition.”

Gulen’s extradition is a top diplomatic priority for Turkey even as it dismisses any talk of a deal.

“Turkey’s pending request for Fethullah Gulen’s extradition from the United States and the investigation into Khashoggi’s murder are two separate issues. They are not connected in any way, shape or form,” said a senior Turkish official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“At no point did Turkey offer to hold back on the Khashoggi investigation in return for Fethullah Gulen’s extradition,” he added.

Analysts point out it’s doubtful Washington could make such an offer, given Gulen’s extradition is a matter for the courts, which experts say is a potentially lengthy and challenging process.

Also, analysts say since Erdogan sees the Saudi crown prince as his chief rival in the region, his goals may extend well beyond an extradition.

“We are in a new phase, and there will be more cooperation between the U.S. and Turkey. And this is part of replacing Mohammed bin Salman,” said former Turkish diplomat Selcen.

“What Erdogan wants to harvest from this case of Khashoggi’s murder,” he added, “is to replace Mohammed bin Salman as the pivotal actor, the linchpin of U.S. strategy in the Middle East.”

Some observers suggest while Turkey has so far handled the Khashoggi case with skill, it could be in danger of overreach, given the importance of the U.S.-Saudi relationship.

But they say the U.S. and Saudi Arabia likely will continue to be on the defensive, especially that Turkey, which may well have more incriminating evidence in the case, is now calling for an international investigation.

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Britain’s May Sticks to Brexit Deal as Rebellion Grows

Embattled British Prime Minister Theresa May came out fighting Friday in defense of her contentious draft Brexit deal, calling on the British public to back her. But critics within her party, who complain the proposed agreement would turn Britain into a “vassal state,” mounted a formal bid to oust her.

The proposed deal with the European Union, more than two years after Britons voted in a referendum to exit the bloc, has triggered half-a-dozen ministerial resignations.

It also prompted high drama in the House of Commons, where May received the most hostile reception a sitting prime minister has endured since 1940, when Neville Chamberlain was pushed out of office at the start of the Second World War.

The withdrawal deal has been pronounced “dead on arrival” by lawmakers across the political spectrum. They say the agreement won’t gain parliamentary backing in a planned vote next month. The deal would see Britain remaining in the EU’s customs union, which address imports and exports, for an indefinite period and subject to the bloc’s rules and regulations without having any say about them

May maintained during a radio interview Friday that she has negotiated the best deal possible, despite it crossing many “red lines” she had set previously. May and her loyalists say there is no alternative to the proposed withdrawal agreement that runs to 538 pages and took many months of tortuous negotiations to seal, because the alternatives are even more unpalatable for Britain or impossible to get the EU and its 27 member countries to accept.

May says the draft agreement is just a staging post, a temporary deal that’s in place while Britain negotiates over the next few years a fuller free trade deal with the bloc. Her supporters say it is no time for a change in leadership with just over four months to go before Britain is scheduled to leave the EU, deal or no deal.

“I am not sure any other prime minister could have done any better,” said Simon Hart, a Conservative lawmaker. “I will say one thing for the prime minister — you can never doubt her resilience and stoicism,” he added.

Partial relief

The prime minister got some relief Friday when a senior minister, Michael Gove, who had been rumored to be resigning to protest the draft deal, said he would be staying in the Cabinet.

It remains unclear, however, whether other prominent hardline Brexiters in May’s thinning Cabinet will follow Gove’s cue over the next few weeks and decide against tendering their resignations. So far, several other Brexiters in the Cabinet have indicated they will stay to work together to improve the deal. “Resigning and joining a rebellion is not going to help anything,” said one of their aides.

Whether their resolve will hold is another thing, if the internecine [destructive] rebellion against May gains momentum.

“Then they will have to consider how their choice plays out in any future leadership election they may want to compete in,” said a party official.

And talk of renegotiation is being rebuffed by EU officials, who on Friday cautioned that the agreement is the best they can do and there can be no changes.

“This is a good deal for both sides,” Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Friday. “No one was tricked into anything,” said Kurz, whose country holds the EU’s rotating presidency until the end of the year. He warned that the only alternative would be for Britain to leave the EU without any deal, which “would hurt Britain badly.”

Mounting leadership challenges

Gove’s decision not to resign didn’t stop more Conservative lawmakers from lodging formal letters with party authorities calling for a vote of no confidence in May as party leader, the first stage in a leadership challenge.

As May started her effort to sell the deal to the public, John Whittingdale, a Brexiter and former culture secretary, filed his letter, joining more than two dozen other Conservative rebels who have publicly called for her to step aside.

“I believe that the agreement that is being proposed does not deliver Brexit in the way that I and many others want to see. It leaves us locked in indefinitely into the customs union. I also don’t think it can get through the House of Commons,” he wrote.

May’s party critics accuse her of going from her oft-stated position that “no deal is better than a bad deal” to one where she appears to accept “any deal is better than no deal.”

“It is no good trying to pretend that the deal honors the result of the referendum when it is obvious to everyone it doesn’t,” said Esther McVey, who resigned this week as works and pension minister.

Time on May’s side

Whether the deal honors what the majority of Britons voted for in June 2016 may be a moot point, say analysts. In trying to sell a deal that satisfies neither Brexiters, who want a sharp break with the EU, nor Remainers, who say staying as a member of the bloc is the only thing that won’t damage Britain, May, if she can see off the rebellion, has time on her side, they say.

She is banking on securing a majority next month for her deal when parliament is scheduled to vote formally on it, by daring lawmakers across the political spectrum — all the opposition parties have formally come out against the deal — to let a “no-deal Brexit” go ahead, likely triggering a recession and leaving behind it bankrupt businesses and ruined livelihoods.

The fear of quitting the EU without a deal seems to be persuading some lawmakers who dislike the agreement to accept they have no option but to back it.

“The most likely alternative is we leave the EU with no deal at all,” wrote Nicky Morgan, a former Conservative minister, in an article for The Guardian newspaper. “And I believe that would be deeply damaging to our economy and our constituents. I cannot sign up to that.”

Party officials, known as Whips, were mounting a feverish effort Friday to dissuade Conservative lawmakers from insisting on holding a no-confidence vote on May’s leadership. Their biggest fear is that if they are unable to do so before lawmakers head back to their constituencies, where the draft agreement is highly unpopular among grassroots Conservatives, then the prime minister will not be able to avoid a leadership challenge and the rebellion will gather steam, analysts say.

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Britain’s May Sticks to Brexit Deal as Rebellion Grows

Embattled British Prime Minister Theresa May came out fighting Friday in defense of her contentious draft Brexit deal, calling on the British public to back her. But critics within her party, who complain the proposed agreement would turn Britain into a “vassal state,” mounted a formal bid to oust her.

The proposed deal with the European Union, more than two years after Britons voted in a referendum to exit the bloc, has triggered half-a-dozen ministerial resignations.

It also prompted high drama in the House of Commons, where May received the most hostile reception a sitting prime minister has endured since 1940, when Neville Chamberlain was pushed out of office at the start of the Second World War.

The withdrawal deal has been pronounced “dead on arrival” by lawmakers across the political spectrum. They say the agreement won’t gain parliamentary backing in a planned vote next month. The deal would see Britain remaining in the EU’s customs union, which address imports and exports, for an indefinite period and subject to the bloc’s rules and regulations without having any say about them

May maintained during a radio interview Friday that she has negotiated the best deal possible, despite it crossing many “red lines” she had set previously. May and her loyalists say there is no alternative to the proposed withdrawal agreement that runs to 538 pages and took many months of tortuous negotiations to seal, because the alternatives are even more unpalatable for Britain or impossible to get the EU and its 27 member countries to accept.

May says the draft agreement is just a staging post, a temporary deal that’s in place while Britain negotiates over the next few years a fuller free trade deal with the bloc. Her supporters say it is no time for a change in leadership with just over four months to go before Britain is scheduled to leave the EU, deal or no deal.

“I am not sure any other prime minister could have done any better,” said Simon Hart, a Conservative lawmaker. “I will say one thing for the prime minister — you can never doubt her resilience and stoicism,” he added.

Partial relief

The prime minister got some relief Friday when a senior minister, Michael Gove, who had been rumored to be resigning to protest the draft deal, said he would be staying in the Cabinet.

It remains unclear, however, whether other prominent hardline Brexiters in May’s thinning Cabinet will follow Gove’s cue over the next few weeks and decide against tendering their resignations. So far, several other Brexiters in the Cabinet have indicated they will stay to work together to improve the deal. “Resigning and joining a rebellion is not going to help anything,” said one of their aides.

Whether their resolve will hold is another thing, if the internecine [destructive] rebellion against May gains momentum.

“Then they will have to consider how their choice plays out in any future leadership election they may want to compete in,” said a party official.

And talk of renegotiation is being rebuffed by EU officials, who on Friday cautioned that the agreement is the best they can do and there can be no changes.

“This is a good deal for both sides,” Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Friday. “No one was tricked into anything,” said Kurz, whose country holds the EU’s rotating presidency until the end of the year. He warned that the only alternative would be for Britain to leave the EU without any deal, which “would hurt Britain badly.”

Mounting leadership challenges

Gove’s decision not to resign didn’t stop more Conservative lawmakers from lodging formal letters with party authorities calling for a vote of no confidence in May as party leader, the first stage in a leadership challenge.

As May started her effort to sell the deal to the public, John Whittingdale, a Brexiter and former culture secretary, filed his letter, joining more than two dozen other Conservative rebels who have publicly called for her to step aside.

“I believe that the agreement that is being proposed does not deliver Brexit in the way that I and many others want to see. It leaves us locked in indefinitely into the customs union. I also don’t think it can get through the House of Commons,” he wrote.

May’s party critics accuse her of going from her oft-stated position that “no deal is better than a bad deal” to one where she appears to accept “any deal is better than no deal.”

“It is no good trying to pretend that the deal honors the result of the referendum when it is obvious to everyone it doesn’t,” said Esther McVey, who resigned this week as works and pension minister.

Time on May’s side

Whether the deal honors what the majority of Britons voted for in June 2016 may be a moot point, say analysts. In trying to sell a deal that satisfies neither Brexiters, who want a sharp break with the EU, nor Remainers, who say staying as a member of the bloc is the only thing that won’t damage Britain, May, if she can see off the rebellion, has time on her side, they say.

She is banking on securing a majority next month for her deal when parliament is scheduled to vote formally on it, by daring lawmakers across the political spectrum — all the opposition parties have formally come out against the deal — to let a “no-deal Brexit” go ahead, likely triggering a recession and leaving behind it bankrupt businesses and ruined livelihoods.

The fear of quitting the EU without a deal seems to be persuading some lawmakers who dislike the agreement to accept they have no option but to back it.

“The most likely alternative is we leave the EU with no deal at all,” wrote Nicky Morgan, a former Conservative minister, in an article for The Guardian newspaper. “And I believe that would be deeply damaging to our economy and our constituents. I cannot sign up to that.”

Party officials, known as Whips, were mounting a feverish effort Friday to dissuade Conservative lawmakers from insisting on holding a no-confidence vote on May’s leadership. Their biggest fear is that if they are unable to do so before lawmakers head back to their constituencies, where the draft agreement is highly unpopular among grassroots Conservatives, then the prime minister will not be able to avoid a leadership challenge and the rebellion will gather steam, analysts say.

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У Київраді планують боротися з незаконною рекламою телефонними дзвінками

Тим, хто розклеює незаконні рекламні оголошення, набридатимуть телефонними дзвінками – відповідне рішення «Про внесення змін до Правил благоустрою міста Києва» 15 листопада ухвалили депутати Київради.

Згідно з рішенням, розміщення оголошень має здійснюватись лише у спеціально призначених для цього місцях. Реклама, розміщена на інших елементах інфраструктури, має бути прибрана власником чи балансоутримувачем.

Читайте також: ​Заборона політичної реклами демократизує вибори (огляд преси)

В разі самовільного розміщення реклами на контактний телефон, вказаний в оголошенні, будуть надходити автоматичні дзвінки з інформуванням про порушення правил благоустрою, повідомляють у прес-службі міської влади.

«Усі оголошення, якими завішаний кожен стовп та стіни будинків – це теж обличчя нашого із вами міста. Тож відтепер всі, хто незаконно розміщує рекламні оголошення, отримуватимуть набридливі телефонні дзвінки кожні кілька хвилин до усунення порушення та сплати штрафу у разі складання протоколу про адмінпорушення», – наводять в повідомленні слова заступника голови КМДА Валентина Мондриївського.

Крім того, рішення Київради передбачає демонтаж так званих брендмобілів – транспортних засобів, які де-факто виконують функцію пересувних рекламних щитів.

За підрахунками столичної влади, після втілення в життя оновлених правил розміщення реклами її кількість до кінця 2018 року має знизитись з семи тисяч наявних зараз до 4 390 по всій території Києва.

Завдяки їх реалізації кількість наземних рекламних засобів вже до кінця 2018 року зменшиться до 4390 одиниць на всю територію Києва, при тому, що наразі у місті понад 7000 наземних конструкцій.

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Міжнародний союз біатлоністів назвав Росії умови відновлення повноважень

Делегація Міжнародного союзу біатлоністів (IBU) на чолі з президентом, шведом Олле Даліном зустрілася 15 листопада в Москві з представниками Союзу біатлоністів Росії (СБР) та іншими російськими спортивними функціонерами, повідомляє сайт організації. IBU оголосив 12 критеріїв, які росіяни мають виконати для відновлення повноправного членства.

У списку умов є окрема програма допінг-тестування для російських біатлоністів, відшкодування витрат, пов’язаних з неповноцінним членством федерації, створення спеціальної програми профілактики допінгу, повна співпраця в розслідуванні минулих потенційних порушень антидопінгових правил та інші.

«IBU надав чіткі і тверді критерії для повторного відновлення Союзу біатлоністів Росії, які відображають абсолютну необхідність захисту чистих спортсменів і гарантують рівні правила гри. Ці критерії також забезпечать, щоб СБР створював ефективні структури, що дозволяють запобігти минулим проблемам у майбутньому», – сказав президент IBU Олле Далін і вказав, що розгляд російського питання відбудеться на позачерговому конгресі IBU в 2019 році.

28 листопада делегація Всесвітнього антидопінгового агентства (WADA) відвідає Московську антидопінгову лабораторію. Комітет із відповідності WADA оцінить виконання російською стороною умов відновлення Російського антидопінгового агентства (РУСАДА) на засіданні, яке пройде 14 та 15 січня.

Після серії допінгових скандалів із російськими біатлоністами Росія була позбавлена права організації міжнародних змагань на своїй території, включно із етапами Кубка світу і чемпіонатами світу. Російські команди брали участь у змаганнях під егідою IBU та на Олімпіаді 2018 року, але в багатьох видах програми їхнє представництво було мінімальним.

Нинішній керівник IBU Олле Далін є всього лише другим президентом міжнародної організації за 25-річну історію її існування. Від моменту заснування і до весни 2018 року незмінним керівником світового біатлону був норвежець Андерс Бессеберґ, який був змушений достроково припинити свої повноваження в результаті пов’язаного з приховуванням допінгових порушень корупційного скандалу.

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Зведення штабу: двоє поранених та знищені будинки в Південному

Упродовж доби 15 листопада контрольовані Росією бойовики 16 разів порушували режим тиші, йдеться в повідомленні штабу Операції об’єднаних сил.

Зокрема ввечері 15 листопада у штабі повідомляли про обстріл селища Південне з боку Горлівки. За даними військових, бойовики застосували міни калібру 120 міліметрів, які знищили два будинки місцевих жителів.

«Враховуючи те, що через цей населений пункт проходить водогін Горлівка – Торецьк, який забезпечує водопостачання майже 60-ти тисяч чоловік, через активні бойові дії російських окупаційних військ, існує велика ймовірність пошкодження його ділянки, що перетинає лінію розмежування», – припускають у штабі, посилаючись на дані української сторони Спільного центру контролю та координації.

Також ЗСУ повідомляють про обстріли в районах кількох населених пунктів, зокрема Станиці Луганської, Малинового, Вільного, Шумів, Авдіївки, Мар’їнки, Водяного та Широкиного. Двоє українських військових отримали поранення.

Від початку доби 16 листопада станом на 7 ранку вогневої активності з боку збройних угруповань не зафіксовано.

Зі свого боку в незаконному збройному угрупованні «ДНР» звинувачують українських військових в обстрілах півдня окупованої ними території , зокрема околиць Горлівки. Внаслідок цього нібито зазнала поранень місцева мешканка.

В аналогічному збройному угрупованні «ЛНР» заявили про три обстріли з боку Збройних сил за минулу добу.

Тристороння контактна група з урегулювання ситуації на Донбасі домовилася про чергове перемир’я, починаючи з півночі 29 серпня. Рішення ухвалили у зв’язку з початком навчального року. Однак в перші ж години ОБСЄ зафіксувала порушення домовленостей.

Раніше схожі режими тиші також не дотримувалися, сторони звинувачували в порушеннях одна одну.

Унаслідок російської гібридної агресії на сході України з квітня 2014 року в регіоні, за даними ООН, загинули понад 10 тисяч людей іще станом на кінець 2017 року – відтоді нових даних не оголошували.

Більше цікавих новин, які не потрапили на сайт, – у Telegram-каналі Радіо Свобода. Долучайтеся!

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45 Years After Her Nomination, Cicely Tyson Gets Her Oscar

Cicely Tyson received her first and only Oscar nomination in 1972. It was for best actress for her work in “Sounder,” which she thinks of as her first major role. She wasn’t called to the stage that year — Liza Minnelli was for “Cabaret” —  but now 45 years later, Tyson is finally getting her Oscar.

 

“It is an emotionally wrenching matter to me,” Tyson said.

 

Tyson, 93, is no stranger to awards and honors. She’s won three Emmys (two in the same year for “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” and one for “The Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All”), a Tony award (for “The Trip to Bountiful”), been a Kennedy Center honoree and, in 2016 was given a Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama. Now she can add one more award to that list as she prepares to accept her honorary Oscar at the 10th annual Governors Awards Sunday in Hollywood.

 

“I come from lowly status. I grew up in an area that was called the slums at the time,” Tyson said. “I still cannot imagine that I have met with presidents, kings, queens. How did I get here? I marvel at it.”

 

When film academy President John Bailey called her to inform her that the Board of Governors voted unanimously to give her the award, she “went to water.”

 

“It is the last thing in the world that I ever expected,” Tyson said, thinking, “I hadn’t done a major movie since ‘The Help.'”

 

Tyson has worked since the 2011 film, with roles in “Last Flag Flying’ and the television show “How to Get Away With Murder,” but ‘The Help’ was the last film that had anyone mentioning her name alongside Oscar. Oprah even called her and predicted she’d get a nomination, to which she responded: “My role was two seconds!’

 

“I am extremely grateful to the Board that they even know my name,” Tyson added with a hearty laugh.

 

She is being honored Sunday along with publicist Marvin Levy and composer Lalo Schifrin.

 

Born in Harlem, Tyson started out as a model and theater actress, eventually landing a role in the film “The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter” in 1968. Her pursuit of acting caused a rift with her mother, who disapproved, but Tyson said she was her “motivating force.”

 

“I was determined to prove her wrong,” Tyson said.

 

Plus, she learned quickly that she had a larger purpose than just acting. On the press tour for “Sounder,” which took her to parts of the United States that she hadn’t yet been to, she remembers a man in a press conference telling her that watching the film made him realize that he was prejudiced.

 

“He said, ‘You know, I could not accept the fact that your older son was referring to his father as daddy. That’s what my son calls me,'” Tyson said. “And I thought to myself, `My God. My God.’ It was those kinds of experiences as I went across the country promoting ‘Sounder’ that made me realize that I, Cicely Tyson, could not afford the luxury of being an actress. There were some issues that I definitely had to address and I chose my profession as my platform.”

 

It led to a lifetime of activism and humanitarianism off screen. Tyson even has a performing arts school named after her in New Jersey and frequently goes on tour to speak to children. On screen Tyson has portrayed women like Coretta Scott King and Harriet Ross Tubman. She decided early that she would only take jobs that “speak to something,” which is also why she ends up saying “no” a lot.

 

“My honorary Oscar proves to me that I was on the right track and I stayed on it,” Tyson said.

 

And while most of the time “no” works, sometimes it doesn’t. Tyson tried to say no to wearing a terrifically large hat to Aretha Franklin’s funeral only to be overruled by her designer. The hat would become a viral highlight.

 

“I never thought in my career that I would be upstaged by a hat! And I did not want to wear it,” Tyson said. “I said, ‘I can’t wear that hat, I will be blocking the view of the people behind me, they won’t be able to see and they’ll call me all kinds of names.’ He just looked at me and said, ‘Put the hat on.'”

 

She came around, eventually, thinking of the hat as homage to Franklin’s appearance at Obama’s inauguration.

 

As for whether or not she’ll don a similarly spectacular piece of art on her head Sunday night at the Governors Awards? Tyson just laughs.

 

“Oh no!” she said. “I won’t even mention it to him.”

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